Ho Math Chess Research and Articles > Why Ho Math and Chess integrated workbook works more effectively?

mathematics learning center franchise
5 Aug 2007

Why Ho Math and Chess integrated workbook works more effectively?
 
Frank Ho
 
It is my belief that integrated math and chess workbook will work more effectively to stimulate one’s brain then by playing just chess alone.
 
As you can see form the article below, the author Dr. He discovered that chess strategy more heavily relies on spatial processing than on logic and computational skills.
 
The second article indicates that different parts of brain is stimulated when playing chess.
 
Ho Math and Chess integrates chess into math thus children actually not only uses the parts of brain while playing chess, they also use the parts of brain to do math computation and work on logic problems using chess diagrams. The effect of working Ho Math and Chess integrated workbooks is to stimulate many different parts of brain in multiple ways.
 
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Chess: Not All About Logic?
 
Spatial processing may be the key to a good game. Chess is not necessarily a game reserved for people with IQ scores on par with Einstein. In fact, chess strategy may rely more heavily on spatial processing than on logic and computational skills.
Chess is not necessarily a game reserved for people with IQ scores on par with Einstein. In fact, chess strategy may rely more heavily on spatial processing than on logic and computational skills. Researchers at the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis used functional magnetic resonance imaging to scan the brains of novice players during a match and found a flurry of activity in the parietal and occipital lobes, areas not associated with general intelligence.
"It's not what we were expecting," says Sheng He, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology. The findings, published in Cognitive Brain Research, have implications beyond castling and checkmate. The activity observed in the parietal lobe suggests that this area may be capable of handling complex spatial functions, such as the interaction of memory and incoming spatial information.
"The parietal lobe may have more functions than we previously suspected," says He. And inactivity in another area -- the left lateral frontal lobe -- raises questions about the role of general intelligence in high-level cognition and problem solving.
 

Let me start with this actual PET scan. PET scans allow scientists to identify specific brain areas that are activated bydifferent tasks. Here researchers have used PET scans to identify the brain areas stimulated in the complex mental activities during a chess game (Nichelli and others, 1994). In scan (a), areas at the back of the brain, where visual information is processed, are most active when a player distinguishes between black and white chess pieces. In (b), the lower middle region of the brain is more active when a player is determining if a particular chess piece can capture another piece.*
 
*Don Hockenbury and Sandra Hockenbury, Psychology, New York: Worth Publishers, 1997, p.68.

 

Frank Ho

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